School-Based FBAs, FAs, and Data Collection: All the things I’ve screwed up #Recorded

$12.00

Instructor: Megan Pennington, M.A., BCBA

Duration: 63 minutes CEU instruction – self-paced

1 General Learning Type BACB® CEUs provided upon course completion – full course description below

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Description

**This course will provide the participant with 1 General Learning Type BACB® CEUs**

Description of Learning Type CE Event: Providing for schools can be tricky. Teachers and school administrators need results, and they need them yesterday. But also, it’s possible you’re not going to get any meaningful data. Here’s how to conduct an effective and time-efficient FBA with robust baseline data for those replacement behaviors. Additionally, we’ll discuss a data collection system that teachers in busy classrooms can (and will!) use.

About the Instructor: Megan Pennington is a Board Certified Behavior Analyst employed by her local school system. She currently provides service to the county’s preschools. Previously, she provided services to K-12 special education classrooms. Before becoming a BCBA, she taught in a high school autism room, worked in several capacities in Title 19 waiver, and worked at Marshall University’s Autism Training Center, providing home-based PBIS.

Target Audience: Behavior Analysts working in schools, preschools, or HeadStart Programs

Learning Objectives for Participants: As a result of this course, participants will be able to …

  • Explain why anecdotal recording during the beginning phase of observational assessments makes your job harder.
  • Compare and contrast three types of functional analyses: standard FA, PFA, and trigger analyses.
  • Identify the challenges of teacher-collected data and list possible strategies/systems.
  • Discuss how using the PTR data collection system created by Dunlap, Wilson, Strain & Lee boasts more social validity over other methods.
  • Identify ways to modify the likert scale to increase the validity of the data.
  • Pronounce Likert the right way. Or don’t. I wouldn’t blame you.